Scaphirhynchus Conference: Alabama, Pallid, and Shovelnose Sturgeon

St. Louis, Missouri, 11-13 January 2005

53.  EXTREMELY HIGH RESOLUTION BATHYMETRY AND "FLY THROUGH" VISUALIZATION MODEL OF THE ST. LOUIS HARBOR, MISSISSIPPI RIVER, FOR THE DETERMINATION OF MOVING VERSUS NON-MOVING BED ZONES

Robert D. Davinroy, Chief, River Engineering, Applied River Engineering Center St. Louis District, Foot of Arsenal Street, St. Louis, Missouri 63118, Phone 314-263-4714, robert.d.davinroy@mvs02.usace.army.mil

Paul D. Clouse, Lockheed Martin, Geospatial Engineering Branch, St. Louis District,

Don E. Rawson, Chief, and Mr. Thomas G. Tobin, Civil Engineer, River Stabilization and Design, New Orleans District

Critical to the possible location of sturgeon species in the Mississippi River is the need to differentiate moving versus non-moving bed zones.  Geological rock formations or other non-erodible zones such as the courser layers of cobbles and gravels that are found along the bottom of the Mississippi River may serve as important habitat to sturgeon.  In addition, the determination of sand wave or dune formations may also help understand why or why not sturgeon species are found in abundance in some stretches of the river.

High-resolution channel bathymetry obtained via channel sweep or multi-sweep sonar methods have been available now for the past decade. However, recently both the St. Louis District and the New Orleans District have collected bathymetry to an even great degree of resolution.  By increasing or overlapping the intensity of data collection passes along the river bottom, and then importing this data into the newest three-dimensional modeling packages, realistic and revealing “fly throughs” can be achieved that can differentiate moving sand layers versus non-moving rock layers as well as defining unprecedented detail in underwater submerged structures, scour hole patterns, and other bathymetric features.

A high- resolution, three dimensional fly thru of the St. Louis Harbor reach of the Mississippi River will be presented detailing sand dunes, dike structures, bridge piers, scour holes, and rock locations.  Other fly thru reaches within the St. Louis District and the New Orleans District will also be displayed.  It is hoped that this type of information, beyond aiding river engineers in physical modeling and construction, can help biologist determine habitat features for sturgeon species along the Mississippi River.