Scaphirhynchus Conference: Alabama, Pallid, and Shovelnose Sturgeon

St. Louis, Missouri, 11-13 January 2005

Schedule:

Monday, JANUARY 10, 2005 

5:30-7:30 p.m. – Registration, Ice-Breaker in the Lobby of the Embassy Suites Hotel

Tuesday, JANUARY 11, 2005

7:30 a.m. - Registration Continues….

8:00-8:20 – Introduction and Welcome to Scaphirhynchus 2005

SYSTEMATICS

Molecular Systematics

8:20-8:40 – Molecular Systematics of the Shovelnose Sturgeons (Scaphirhynchinae) of North America and Central Asia.   Robert M. Wood, Casey Dillman, Jeff M. Ray, and Richard L. Mayden, Department of Biology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri; Bernard R. Kuhajda, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama (Abstract #2)

8:40-9:00 – Genetic Discrimination of Pallid (Scaphirhynchus albus) and Shovelnose Sturgeons (S. platorhynchus) Using DNA Microsatellite Markers.  Aaron W. Schrey and Edward J. Heist, Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center and Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University-Carbondale  (Abstract #3)

9:00-9:20 - Microsatellite Analysis of Scaphirhynchus Species From the Southeastern United States.  Jeff M. Ray, Casey B. Dillman and Robert M. Wood, Department of Biology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri; Bernard R. Kuhajda, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Richard L. Mayden, Department of Biology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri (Abstract #4)

Morphological Systematics

9:20-9:40 - Morphological and Ecological Variation Within Shovelnose Sturgeons (Scaphirhynchinae) of North America and Central Asia.  Bernard R. Kuhajda, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama; Richard L. Mayden, Department of Biology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri; and Vladimir B. Salnikov, National Institute of Deserts, Flora and Fauna, Ashgabat, Turkmenistan  (Abstract #5)

9:40-10:00 - Morphometric Variation Among Scaphirhynchus Specimens in the Lower and Middle Mississippi River.  Catherine E. Murphy, Jan J. Hoover, Steven G. George, and K. Jack Killgore, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi (Abstract #6)

10:00-10:20 - Break:  Coffee/Soft Drinks

10:20-10:40 - Identification of Scaphirhynchus albus, S. platorynchus, and S. albus x  S. platorynchus Hybrids Using Morphological Characters.  Bernard R. Kuhajda, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama; Richard L. Mayden and Robert M. Wood, Department of Biology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri  (Abstract #7)

 HATCHERY OPERATIONS & STOCKING ISSUES: RECOVERY IMPLICATIONS

10:40-11:00 - Propagation of Pallid Sturgeon from the Old River Control Complex, Louisiana.   Jan Dean, Natchitoches National Fish Hatchery, Natchitoches, Louisiana; and Bobby Reed, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Lake Charles, Louisiana (Abstract #8)

11:00-11:20 - Culture of Pallid Sturgeon at the Gavins Point National Fish Hatchery.  Herb Bollig, Gavins Point National Fish Hatchery, Yankton, South Dakota  (Abstract #9)

11:20-11:40 - Fish Health Assessment of Captive-Reared Pallid Sturgeon and Recovery Implications.  Beth MacConnell, Linda Beck, and Crystal Hudson.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bozeman Fish Health Center, Bozeman, Montana  (Abstract #10)

11:40-12:00 - Effects of dietary Energy Content on Growth and Liver Condition of Shovelnose Sturgeon.  Rick Barrows, Matt Toner, Beth MacConnell and Linda Beck.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bozeman Fish Health Center, Bozeman, Montana  (Abstract #11)

12:00-1:00 – Lunch on Your Own

LIFE HISTORY STUDIES

Reproduction

1:00-1:20 - Physical and Hormonal Examination of Missouri River Shovelnose Sturgeon Reproductive State.  Mark L. Wildhaber, Diana M. Papoulias, Aaron J. DeLonary, Donald E. Tillitt, Janice L. Bryan, and Mandy L. Annis, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, Columbia, Missouri  (Abstract #12)

1:20-1:40 - Effectiveness of Non- and Minimally Invasive Methods for Estimating Reproductive State and Fecundity of Shovelnose and Pallid Sturgeons.  Janice L. Bryan, Mark L. Wildhaber, Diana M. Papoulias, Aaron J. Delonay, D. E. Tillitt, and Mandy L. Annis U.S.G.S. Columbia Environmental Research Center, Columbia, Missouri  (Abstract #13)

1:40-2:00 - A Guide to the Gonadal Development of the Shovelnose Sturgeon.  Robert E. Colombo and James E. Garvey, Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois  (Abstract #14)

2:00-2:20 - Assessment of Scaphirhynchus spp. Spawning and Rearing Locations in the Middle Mississippi River: Insights From Collection of Larval and Young-of-the-Year Fishes.  David P. Herzog and R. Hrabik, Missouri Department of Conservation, Open Rivers and Wetlands Field Station, Jackson, Missouri; R. Brooks and T. Spier, Southern Illinois University, Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Carbondale Illinois; D. Ostendorf, J. Ridings, J. Crites, and C. Beachum, Missouri Department of Conservation, Open Rivers and Wetlands Field Station, Jackson, Missouri; and R. Colombo, Southern Illinois University, Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Carbondale, Illinois  (Abstract #15)

2:20-2:40 - Application of Telemetry and Biologically-Delivered Remote-Sensor Technology to Evaluate Reproductive Behavior of Shovelnose Sturgeon.  Aaron J. DeLonay, Diana M. Papoulias, Mark L. Wildhaber and Sabrina A. Griffith, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, Columbia, Missouri  (Abstract #16)

2:40-3:00 - Evaluating Scaphirhynchus Spawning Success: The Use of Physiological Indicators.  Diana M. Papoulias, Aaron J. DeLonay, Mandy L. Annis, and Donald E. Tillitt, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, Columbia, Missouri  (Abstract #17)

3:00-3:20  - Break:  Coffee/Soft Drinks

Population Ecology/Status

3:20-3:40 - Collection Efforts for the Alabama Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus suttkusi).  Steve Rider and Philip Kilpatrick, Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries, Montgomery, Alabama  (Abstract #18)

3:40-4:00 - Population Abundance and Size Characteristics of Shovelnose Sturgeon in the Upper Missouri River, Montana.  William M. Gardner, Montana Fish and Wildlife and Parks, Lewistown, Montana  (Abstract #19)

4:00-4:20 - Evaluation of the Condition, Distribution, Structure, and Growth of Shovelnose Sturgeon in the Lower Platte River, Nebraska.  Dane A. Shuman, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Great Plains-Fish and Wildlife Management Assistance Office, Pierre, South Dakota; and Edward J. Peters and James Parham, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska  (Abstract #20)

4:20-4:40 - Estimates of Shovelnose Sturgeon and Pallid Sturgeon Population Densities in the Platte River, Nebraska, 2000-2004.  Edward J. Peters, James E. Parham, and Jason J. Olnes, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska; Dane A. Shuman, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Pierre, South Dakota; and Benjamin D. Swigle, U.S. Geological Survey, Klamath Falls, Oregon  (Abstract #21)

4:40-5:00 - Habitat and Population Attributes of Pallid Sturgeon in the Lower Mississippi River.  K. Jack Killgore, Jan J. Hoover, Steven G. George, Bradley R. Lewis, and Catherine E. Murphy, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi  (Abstract #22)

5:00-5:20 - Population Abundance and Size Characteristics of Pallid Sturgeon from the Old River Control Complex, Louisiana.  Bobby C. Reed, Louisiana Department of Wildlife and Fisheries, Lake Charles, Louisiana; Jan C. Dean.  Natchitoches National Fish Hatchery, Natchitoches, Louisiana  (Abstract #23)

5:20-6:30 – POSTER SESSION

Food Habits of the Alabama Sturgeon, Scaphirhynchus suttkusi Williams and Clemmer, A Endangered Species.  Christopher Haynes, Department of Biology, Shelton State College, Tuscaloosa, Alabama; Richard L. Mayden department of Biology St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri; and Bernard R. Kuhajda, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama  (Abstract #47)

Pallid and Shovelnose Sturgeon Larvae Morphological Description and Identification.  Darrel E. Snyder, Larval Fish Laboratory, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife Biology, Colorado State University, Ft. Collins, Colorado  (Abstract #48)

Types and Occurrence of Physical Anomalies in Lower and Middle Mississippi River.  Bradley R. Lewis, Catherine E. Murphy, Jan J. Hoover, Steven G. George, and K. Jack Killgore.  U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi  (Abstract #49)

Reproductive Biology of Sexually Mature Female Shovelnose Sturgeon During the Spring Spawning Migration in the Wabash River, Indiana.  Anthony J. Kennedy and Trent M. Sutton, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana; and Thomas C. Stefanavage and Brant E. Fisher, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Atterbury Fish and Wildlife Area, Edinburg, Indiana  (Abstract #50) 

Telemetry of Shovelnose Sturgeon in the Yellowstone River and Missouri River Below Fort Peck Dam: Movement Patterns, Concentration Areas, and Dead Zones.  David B. Fuller, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Fort Peck, Montana; Patrick J. Braaten, U. S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, Fort Peck Project Office, Fort Peck, Montana  (Abstract #51)

Shallow Water Sturgeon Habitat for the Lower Missouri River.  Donald G. Jorgensen, William M. Beacom, and Donald M. Meisner; Missouri River Technical Committee of the Siouxland Chamber of Commerce; Sioux City, Iowa  (Abstract #52)

Extremely High Resolution Bathymetry and “Fly Through” Visualization Model of the St. Louis Harbor, Mississippi River, for the Determination of moving Versus Non-Moving Bed Zones.  Robert D. Davinroy and Paul D. Clouse, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis District, St. Louis, Missouri; and Don E. Rawson, and Thomas G. Tobin, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New Orleans District, New Orleans, Louisiana (Abstract #53)

Seasonal Distribution, Relative Abundance, and Movement Patterns of Shovelnose Sturgeon in the Wabash River, Indiana.  Anthony J. Kennedy, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University; Thomas C. Stefanavage,  Indiana Department of Natural Resources; Leslie D. Frankland, Illinois Department of Natural Resources;  Brant E. Fisher, Indiana Department of Natural Resources; and Trent M. Sutton, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University (Abstract #54)

Relationships Between Habitat Availability and River Discharge for Scaphirhynchus Sturgeons in the Lower Platte River, Nebraska.   James E Parham, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska; Benjamin D. Swigle, Klamath Falls Biological Field Station,USGS, Klamath Falls, Oregon; Dane A. Shuman, Great Plains-Fish and Wildlife Management Assistance Office, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Pierre, South Dakota; Vaughn A. Snook, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Lanesboro, Minnesota; Edward J. Peters, 12 Plant Industry, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska  (Abstract #55)

6:30-End – BANQUET and Banquet Presentations

6:30- Migrating with the Sturgeon Through History.  Inga Saffron (Author of Caviar: The Strange History and Uncertain Future of the World’s Most Coveted Delicacy); Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania  (No Abstract)

6:30- How Many Species of Scaphirhynchus are there?  North American Sturgeon Biodiversity According to the Experts.  Richard L. Mayden, Department of Biology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri; Bernard R. Kuhajda, Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama; and Robert M. Wood, Department of Biology, St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri  (Abstract #1)

Wednesday, JANUARY 12, 2005

Exploitation

8:00-8:20 - Population Characteristics of Shovelnose Sturgeon from an Exploited and Unexploited Reach of the Wabash River, Indiana. Anthony J. Kennedy and Trent M. Sutton, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana; Thomas C. Stefanavage and Brant E. Fisher, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, Atterbury Fish and Wildlife Area, Edinburg, Indiana; and Leslie D. Frankland, Illinois Department of Natural Resources, Abion, Illinois  (Abstract #24)

8:20-8:40 - Changes in Shovelnose Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) abundance during winter sampling in the Middle Mississippi River.  David P. Herzog, Missouri Department of Conservation, Open Rivers and Wetlands Field Station, Jackson, Missouri; V. Travnichek, Missouri Department of Conservation, Northwest Regional Office, St. Joseph, Missouri; and D. Ostendorf, V. Barko, J. Ridings, J. Crites and C. Beachum, Missouri Department of Conservation, Open Rivers and Wetlands Field Station, Jackson, Missouri  (Abstract #25)

Habitat/Habitat Use

8:40-9:00 - Habitat Use and Diet of Hatchery-Reared Juvenile Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) and Juvenile Shovelnose Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) in the Missouri River Above Fort Peck Reservoir, Montana.  Paul C. Gerrity and Christopher S. Guy, Montana Cooperative Fishery Research Unit, Department of Ecology, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana; and William M. Gardner, Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Lewistown, Montana  (Abstract # 26)

9:00-9:20 - Lower Missouri River Spring Rise:  Some Factors Related to Pallid Sturgeon Spawning.  Donald G. Jorgensen, Missouri River Technical Committee of the Siouxland Chamber of Commerce, Iowa  (Abstract #27)

9:20-9:40 - Quantification of Fluid and Bed Dynamics for Characterizing Benthic Physical Habitat in Large Rivers.  David Gaeuman, Robert B. Jacobson, and Harold E. Johnson, II, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, Columbia, Missouri  (Abstract #28)

9:40-10:00 - A Laboratory Examination of Substrate, Depth, and Light Use by Juvenile Pallid (Scaphirhynchus albus) and Shovelnose (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) Sturgeon.  Teri C. Allen, Dawn Lamm and Robert D. Davinroy.  St. Louis District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, St. Louis, Missouri  (Abstract #29)

10:10:20 - Break:  Coffee/Soft Drinks

10:20-10:40 - Habitat Selection of Juvenile Shovelnose Sturgeon.  Elise R. Irwin, USGS, Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; and Marilyn Taylor, Katie Mickett, and Peter Sakaris, Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Auburn, Alabama (Abstract #30)

10:40-11:00 - Alabama Sturgeon Habitat in the Alabama River: Integration of Laboratory Habitat Selection Studies and Field Measurements.  Elise R. Irwin, USGS, Alabama Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Gareth Turner, Alabama Cooperative Fish and wildlife Research Unit, Auburn, Alabama; Paul Hartfield, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Jackson, Mississippi; and Richard Moreland, USGS, Montgomery, Alabama (Abstract #31)

11:00-11:20 - Shallow Water Habitat Construction – Missouri River, Ponca to the Mouth.  John I. Remus II.  Omaha District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha Nebraska  (Abstract # 32)

Food Habits

11:20-11:40 - The Real Poop on Pallid Sturgeon Ecology: Fecal Analysis as a Technique for Reconstructing Diet and Inferring Habitat and Behavior.  Steven G. George, Jan J. Hoover, Catherine E. Murphy, and K. Jack Killgore, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi  (Abstract #33)

Behavior – Acoustic Communication

11:40-12:00 – Sound Production in Scaphirhynchus:  Potential Use as a Conservation Tool.  Catherine N. Phillips and Carol E. Johnson, Department of Fisheries, Auburn University Auburn, Alabama  (Abstract #34)

12:00-1:00 – Lunch on Your Own

Movement and Dispersal

1:00-1:20 - Experimental Studies of Pallid Sturgeon Dispersal and Vertical Swimming Height During Ontogeny.  Boyd Kynard, E. Parker, D. Pugh, and T. Parker, Conte Anadramous Fish Research Center, University of Massachusetts, Turners Falls, Massachusetts  (Abstract #35)

1:20-2:00 - Drift Dynamics of Larval Pallid Sturgeon in a Side Channel of the Upper Missouri River, Montana.  Patrick J. Braaten, U. S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, Fort Peck Project Office, Fort Peck, Montana; David B. Fuller, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Fort Peck, Montana  (Abstract #36)

2:00-2:20 - River Connectivity for Migrating Shovelnose Sturgeon in the Lower Platte River, Nebraska.  James E. Parham, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska; Benjamin D. Swigle, Klamath Falls Biological Field Station, USGS, Klamath Falls, Oregon; and Edward J. Peters, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Nebraska  (Abstract #37)

2:20-2:40 - Dispersal of Hatchery Reared Pallid Sturgeon from a Stocking Site on the Lower Missouri River.  Andrew Starostka and Wyatt Doyle, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia Fishery Resource Office, Columbia Missouri  (Abstract #38)

2:40-3:00 - Post-Stocking Movements of Juvenile Pallid Sturgeon in the Missouri River Below Fort Randall Dam, South Dakota.  George Jordan, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Billings, Montana; Greg Wanner, Wayne Stancill, and Robert Klumb, U.S. Fish and Willdlife Service, Great Plains Fish and Wildlife Management Assistance Office, Pierre, South Dakota  (Abstract #39)

3:00-3:20 - Break:  Coffee/Soft Drinks

3:40-4:00 - Monitoring Sturgeon Long-Range Movement in the Middle Mississippi River.  Timothy W. Spier, Department of Biological Sciences, Western Illinois University, Macomb, Illinois; James Garvey, Ron Brooks, Rob Colombo, Brian Koch, and Chris Williamson, SIUC Fisheries and IL Aquaculture Center, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois  (Abstract #40)

Swimming Performance

3:20-3:40 - Swimming, Skimming, and Hunkering Down:  Station-Holding by Acipenseriform fishes and Entrainment Risk by Dredges.  Jan J. Hoover, K. Jack Killgore, and Doug Clarke, U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, Mississippi  (Abstract #41)

Sampling Efficiency

3:40-4:00 - Evaluation of Gear Efficiency and Bias for Shovelnose Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) on the Lower Missouri River.  Wyatt Doyle, Columbia Fishery Resources Office (USFWS), Columbia, Missouri; and Craig Paukert, Kansas Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, USGS/Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas  (Abstract #42)

4:00-4:20 - Trammel Net Efficiency for Juvenile Pallid Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) and Shovelnose Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus):  Implications for Sampling Design.  Eric W. Oldenburg, Paul C. Gerrity, and Christopher S. Guy, Montana Cooperative Fishery Research Unit, Department of Ecology, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana; and William M. Gardner, Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks, Lewistown, Montana  (Abstract #43)

4:20-4:40 - Comparison of Gears for Sampling Sturgeon Species in the Middle Mississippi River.  David P. Herzog, Missouri Department of Conservation, Open Rivers and Wetlands Field Station, Jackson, Missouri; R. Brooks and T. Spier.  Southern Illinois University, Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Carbondale Illinois; D. Ostendorf, J. Ridings, J. Crites, and C. Beachum, Missouri Department of Conservation, Open Rivers and Wetlands Field Station, Jackson, Missouri; and R. Combo, Southern Illinois University, Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Carbondale Illinois  (Abstract #44)

Contaminants

4:40-5:00 - Organochlorine Accumulation in Middle Mississippi River Shovelnose Sturgeon:  Intersexuality and Reproductive Consequences.  Brian Koch, James E. Garvey, and Michael J. Lydy, Fisheries and Illinois Aquaculture Center, Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Illinois  (Abstract #45)

5:00-5:20 - Sensitivity of Shovelnose Sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) Toward TCDD or a Chlordane Mixture: Early Life State Development and Survival.  Donald E. Tillitt, Diana M. Papoulias, James Candrl, Mandy L. Annis, and Diane K. Nicks, U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia Environmental Research Center, Columbia, Missouri; and Michael Coffey, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, Region 3, Rocks Island Ecological Services Field Office, Rock Island, Illinois  (Abstract #46)

5:20-5:40 - Conference Summary:  Lessons Learned.

Thursday, JANUARY 13, 2005

8:00-Finish – Scaphirhynchus Genetics Working Group Meeting  (Contact Dr. Robert Wood for information; Phone:  314-977-3904; e-mail:  wood2@slu.edu)  

8:00-Finish – Pallid Sturgeon Recovery Team Meeting  (The general public is invited to observe the meeting but active participation is reserved for Recovery Team members only)